The Proper Way To Ask Your Employer For A Raise

April 24th, 2015

If you’ve been at your job for a significant amount of time and have yet to receive a raise, it may not be because your employer is being unfair to you. Often the primary reason employees don’t earn more in their jobs is because they simply didn’t ask. Marching down the hall and pounding on the door probably isn’t the most effective method. However, there is an art form to asking for more money in the right way. Here are some tips for asking your manager for a raise in the proper way.

  • Consider the timing. There is never a “good time” to ask for a raise. If you wait for one then you might wait forever. On the other hand, there are also some particularly bad times to approach your manager. For example, don’t ask during a particularly sensitive deadline process. You may also look for clues around the office. Do most reviews happen at the end of the year? If so, schedule a meeting around the same time.
  • Do your homework. Asking for the wrong raise is almost as bad as never asking for one. Before you approach your manager with your request, know what you’re looking for and what is appropriate for your level of service and experience. You can use resources such as Salary.com to review common pay rates in your area and create a case around those numbers.
  • Prepare to make your case. Once you have the information in hand, you need to prepare a presentation to let your manager know why you’re making this request. Collect data from your tenure in your job. What projects have you contributed to? What was the success rate? How has your work specifically impacted the company in a positive way? Being able to show numbers that illustrate your positive effect will help your case.
  • Is this part of a promotion? Do you want more than money? It is important to know what you’re asking for before you approach your manager. Perhaps someone has recently left the organization and an advanced opportunity is available. You want to strike while the iron is hot and before they invest too much money in outside recruiting.
  • Know how to take rejection. It is also important that you know how to react if they refuse your request. Walking into that meeting and envisioning each scenario will have you prepared to respond properly and not through emotion. Keep in mind that this is a negotiation and not an ultimatum. The door isn’t closed forever because they weren’t able to honor your request. Take this opportunity to ask why and do what you can to improve the situation on your side.

Meador Staffing matches quality job candidates and top employers to find the right fit for each side. Meador Staffing is hiring for jobs in Austin TX and beyond so call us today!

Should You Pass On A Candidate If They’re Overqualified

April 17th, 2015

There was a time in our culture where the word “overqualified” wasn’t even used. Since the most recent recession, many employers are falling back on this reason to avoid hiring certain professionals. Job seekers are increasingly, and understandably, more frustrated by the job market because of this one word. But overqualified doesn’t have to mean unemployable. You can leverage the candidates’ skills to your advantage. Here are some reasons you may not want to pass on an overqualified employee.

  1. Top-quality experience. An overqualified employee will be able to handle the function of the job with fewer problems. Their years of experience may be more than the job requires, but that also means they have more maturity. They have learned from their mistakes and won’t repeat them at your company. The cost of a bad hire can rack up pretty quickly so someone with business experience can help mitigate that issue.
  2. Innovative mind. Higher levels of experience also lead to the development of new ideas that you were never expecting. They may notice something about the way your company handles the job that they can improve or augment. You will not get this same perspective from an entry-level candidate. Creativity and innovation can make the difference between someone who can do the job and someone who can excel at it.
  3. Extreme professionalism. Life experience will foster professionalism and a mature candidate will have developed better skills to deal with some of the challenges of the job. They also already have a familiarity with business protocol, even if it was for another company, which can translate to the way you run your company. You won’t have to explain what to talk about in the office, how to communicate with executives, or how to avoid over-stepping their roles on a project.
  4. Dedication and loyalty. Due to the way the job market tends to treat overqualified employees, they are looking for companies where they can establish long-term relationships and make a positive impact. They tend to be very loyal while some entry-level candidates are more likely to get their experience and leave for another position. It’s easy to remember the time and resources needed after making a bad hire, but also have to keep in mind those same resources are needed if a new employee leaves for a new position after a short time period.

Are you currently interviewing for new opportunities in your company? Meador Staffing Agencies in Pasadena TX can help you source and hire the right candidates.

Networking Best Practices: How To Make Important Industry Connections

April 10th, 2015

Face-to-face networking is an essential skill, even as we become continually more dependent on technology. Getting your next job opportunity may be reliant on the connections you’ve made throughout your career. Online networking makes this process easier, but it isn’t the whole picture. For the best results, you need to focus on all aspects of networking within your industry as well as online. Here are some best practices to help you get your networking experience off on the right foot.

Online Networking Resources

LinkedIn is the clear winner when it comes to developing and maintaining professional connections online. The site is easy to navigate and provides an entire section dedicated to “People you may know.” Use LinkedIn to connect to former co-workers or managers, other professionals in your area, and groups that apply to your interests or skills. Facebook (interaction) and Twitter (information) can also provide some online networking opportunities. Each social media network provides its own strengths and weaknesses.

In-person Networking Resources

With the ease of connecting online, many people often neglect face-to -face networking. Attend local industry events to meet others in your field where you can feel comfortable talking about your professional and personal interests. If you’re nervous about meeting new people, volunteer so you feel useful and that you are helping others. Join a website like MeetUp.com to find others interested in the same industries or who have the same skills. Online groups often facilitate local meetings as well.

Introduce Yourself Everywhere

Networking in person can be more nuanced than clicking a box on LinkedIn. Carry cards with you at all times. Introduce yourself to people you’re standing in line with at the bank. When you’re out at social events, don’t be afraid to talk about what you do. You never know who you will meet and if they might be able to help you. Gaining more practice by talking with new connections will increase your confidence and make you more comfortable in those situations.

Perform Regular Maintenance

Following up is extremely important when it comes to networking. Contacts you don’t see again are useless and result in thousands of business cards piling up in a drawer. Send a thank-you email the day after you’ve met. Share interesting information you’ve found every once in a while. The best way to keep a connection is to provide a service for them. What can you do that would benefit the relationship? Be a connector and facilitate introductions within your network.

Do you want more networking tips for your career? Meador Staffing is now hiring for jobs in Austin TX and can help you today!

Unemployment Rate On The Decline In Texas

April 3rd, 2015

If you’ve ever thought about employment in Texas there are a number of reasons our state is a great place to work. Not the least of which includes the decline of the unemployment rate over the last several years. As of December 2014, Texas had an unemployment rate of 4.6 percent. The national average still remains at 5.6 percent during the same time period. Let’s take a look at why the unemployment rate is on the decline in Texas and how this translates to better jobs overall.

  • Booming cities. Midland, Texas has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country currently standing at 2.6%. Amarillo, Lubbock, Austin, and Dallas are all significantly below the national numbers as well. Texas is also a great state for a variety of employment benefits including no state income tax, which helps employees keep more of the money they make each week and throughout the year.
  • Increased industry. Texas is leading the way in a number of high tech industries. Careers in aerospace and aviation, biotechnology, information technology, and energy are all booming in the state. Job seekers interested in these roles or open to learning new skills will do well to focus on these industries and explore opportunities in these areas.
  • Housing availability. Because of increased job opportunities in major metropolitan areas, housing is also seeing a boom. This also means that there is an increased need for real estate agents and a variety of housing-related jobs. The current average housing cost for all type of properties in Austin, Texas stands at over $500,000, but there are more affordable options as well. Depending on where you want to live, you may be able to get a good deal on rental properties.
  • Long-term effects. The Austin area remains the top performing city in the state and the long-term forecast remains positive. The service industry, durable manufacturing, and trades will continue to advance the economy of the city along with the industries mentioned above. It is expected that the metropolitan areas of Texas will see growth through 2040 and beyond.

Are you interested in working in Texas? Meador Staffing is now hiring for jobs in Austin TX so call us now!