What Happens When You Get Promoted to Being the Boss?

March 17th, 2016

When you’re rewarded with a promotion in your current company, what happens to your former co-workers? In many cases they become your new team, and you’re thrust into a management role over individuals with whom you’ve worked closely for some time. It is no surprise this can create tension in the workplace. How do you deal effectively with your new role as boss? Here are some tips you can follow to make the transition easier.

Acknowledge the change.

There is really no point in trying to pretend like nothing’s changed. Management is a very different type of position than general employment, and it is critical that you let everyone know that you are now in a position to supervise them. This acknowledgement, instead of insisting things will continue the same as before, is the first step in building trust with your former co-workers.

Communicate your expectations.

You also need to be clear in your communications with your new team. Setting expectations early about what is required and what is not appropriate will help set the tone long term. In this process, also make sure to give your team an opportunity to ask questions, offer suggestions and provide feedback. Utilize that information to ensure you are a positive force. Establishing guidelines will take time and should evolve. Finding a balance between your management style and what works for your team will take time.

Don’t rule like a dictator.

While you don’t want to continue to pretend things are business as usual once you’re in a supervisor role, you also shouldn’t completely alter your personality and start ruling with an iron fist. Micromanagement is one of the biggest complaints for employees, and they will view it as a direct betrayal when it comes from someone they recently saw as one of their peers.

Address resentment.

If anyone you work with does start to act resentful for the fact that you were promoted and they weren’t, address the issue. If you do not, things could spiral out of control. Their work could suffer and you could have additional conflicts. Talk to them about their feelings and be supportive. Ignoring the issue will lead to bigger problems down the road, either through an office argument or the employee leaving the office.

Create a new network.

Now that you are no longer in the same peer group, it is important that you find a network of other managers that can be your accountability group or mentors to help address your questions along the way. Talk to the individual who was in your role before you, if they are still with the company, or join management groups online to get feedback and help you with problems.

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