The Proper Way To Ask Your Employer For A Raise

April 24th, 2015

If you’ve been at your job for a significant amount of time and have yet to receive a raise, it may not be because your employer is being unfair to you. Often the primary reason employees don’t earn more in their jobs is because they simply didn’t ask. Marching down the hall and pounding on the door probably isn’t the most effective method. However, there is an art form to asking for more money in the right way. Here are some tips for asking your manager for a raise in the proper way.

  • Consider the timing. There is never a “good time” to ask for a raise. If you wait for one then you might wait forever. On the other hand, there are also some particularly bad times to approach your manager. For example, don’t ask during a particularly sensitive deadline process. You may also look for clues around the office. Do most reviews happen at the end of the year? If so, schedule a meeting around the same time.
  • Do your homework. Asking for the wrong raise is almost as bad as never asking for one. Before you approach your manager with your request, know what you’re looking for and what is appropriate for your level of service and experience. You can use resources such as Salary.com to review common pay rates in your area and create a case around those numbers.
  • Prepare to make your case. Once you have the information in hand, you need to prepare a presentation to let your manager know why you’re making this request. Collect data from your tenure in your job. What projects have you contributed to? What was the success rate? How has your work specifically impacted the company in a positive way? Being able to show numbers that illustrate your positive effect will help your case.
  • Is this part of a promotion? Do you want more than money? It is important to know what you’re asking for before you approach your manager. Perhaps someone has recently left the organization and an advanced opportunity is available. You want to strike while the iron is hot and before they invest too much money in outside recruiting.
  • Know how to take rejection. It is also important that you know how to react if they refuse your request. Walking into that meeting and envisioning each scenario will have you prepared to respond properly and not through emotion. Keep in mind that this is a negotiation and not an ultimatum. The door isn’t closed forever because they weren’t able to honor your request. Take this opportunity to ask why and do what you can to improve the situation on your side.

Meador Staffing matches quality job candidates and top employers to find the right fit for each side. Meador Staffing is hiring for jobs in Austin TX and beyond so call us today!