What You Need to Ask before Accepting a Job Offer

June 12th, 2015

Congratulations! You have had a successful interview, and the company is interested in making you an offer. All that’s left is to say is “yes,” right? Well, maybe. There are lots things you should consider before accepting a job offer, and the only way to find out what you really need to know is to ask the right questions. Here are some of the things you should be asking potential employers before you accept their offer.

How soon do you need an answer?

There are very few circumstances where you will want to say yes to a job offer immediately upon receiving it. You may have other companies you want to follow up with or you may need to give notice to your current employer. But you need to strike a balance. You can’t leave an employer hanging too long or they will move on to their next candidate. Find out the answer to this question before moving on to the next steps.

What is the complete compensation package?

You’ve probably discussed the salary so that should already be agreed upon, but what about the other aspects of compensation? What is the bonus structure and do you qualify? What are the benefits available to you and how do you take advantage of them completely? How long does it take to qualify for medical benefits or retirement matching? You should be armed with all the details before you start working.

What is the company’s vacation policy?

Another aspect of compensation is personal time off. There are many ways a company can handle this. You may be given a lump sum of PTO days that can use throughout the year based on your own discretion. Others offer packages where you earn time off as you continue to work. Or, they may have separate vacation, personal days, and sick days that are counted differently. The way they organize their time off may influence your decision.

What is the view on work/life balance?

In regards to time off, it is also important to know how much value the company places on your work/life balance. Is this a job that expects more than 40 hours a week? Do they work with other employees who have families to provide allowances for childcare or family emergencies? Look at how they treat their current employees for a better idea.

Who will I be working with directly?

And speaking of other employees, you may want to have a chance to speak with the other members of your team before you start if you haven’t already. You want to know whether or not you can see yourself working with these people every day. In many cases, employees see their co-workers more often than they see their families, so it is imperative that you can get along.

Meador Staffing is now hiring for jobs in Austin TX and more. Contact us today to get started with all of your employment needs.

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Correctly Handle Conflict In The Workplace

May 22nd, 2015

Avoiding conflict is common and sometimes necessary to maintain sanity, but as a manager it is critical that you are able to correctly deal with conflict in your organization. Whenever you have more than one person in a place there is bound to be natural disagreements, and the key is how to solve them. Far too often in order to avoid these negative confrontations, managers allow low production or bad behavior to continue. If you need to put a stop to conflict in your office, here are some easy to follow ideas.

Walk a mile in their shoes.

Constructive criticism is often avoided in an effort to maintain positivity in the office. Unfortunately, sometimes it is far too late to stop some of the bad habits this encourages. If an employee doesn’t know  their performance isn’t up to your standards then they really can’t be held reliable for it. You need to share your concerns with them as mistakes happen and give them a chance to improve. This communication will help eliminate the changes of much bigger mistakes in the future.

Provide a pathway for feedback.

When you wait until everything has gone terribly wrong to talk to your employees, then it will be clear that you only meet with them for bad reasons. A manager who has a reputation of only sharing negative feedback will be universally disliked by their employees. Instead, create a pathway to provide all types of feedback in the form of one-on-one conversations with employees. Do this routinely (weekly or monthly) and let people know they can bring concerns to you at any time.

Bring data to the table.

Avoiding conflict is usually about fear of the unknown. What will they say? How will they react? Will they argue? They may become defensive or give excuses for their behavior. Of course, all of these will happen at one point or another so it is important to be prepared. Having the right information to back up your side of the story is critical. This will stop the employee from trying to challenge your position.

Don’t make it personal.

Of course, you need to step back from the fear that you will sound mean when you address conflict. You also need to stress to your employees that you’re never attacking them as a person, but you need to solve critical issues in the office that aren’t conducive to productivity. Always let them know you’re criticism is based on your believe that they are capable of doing a better job.

Meador Staffing can help with any of your needs as one of the top staffing agencies in Austin TX. Contact us today to get started!

When It’s Okay To Say “No” To A Job Offer

March 27th, 2015

Some job seekers feel like they have no choice but to accept a job offer especially if they’ve been on the job market for a while. However, this is not the case. There may be times in your career when saying no is the best possible choice you can make. So how do you know when it is okay to refuse a job? Before you walk away, look at these reasons for saying no and how they impact your long-term career strategy.

  • When it doesn’t suit your long-term goals. Taking just any job could pose a challenge for your long-term career goals. If the job offer is not in line with the goals that you have in mind for your career, then you will be better to continue the job search until something more appropriate comes along. While you could be frustrated with your job, taking too many steps back could really hinder your career path.
  • When it doesn’t service your reputation. If taking the job could actually damage your reputation and impact the ability to find jobs later in your career, you should turn it down. If you have concerns about the how this job will be perceived on your resume in the future, it may be best to walk away. Remember, don’t focus too much on the short term.
  • When you can’t imagine doing it every day. It is important that you find yourself not only employed but doing something that helps further your life’s purpose. What do you really love to do? What are you really good at? What does the world need? If you find it difficult to imagine yourself doing this work every day, then it may not be for you.
  • When you have concerns about the ethics. Do you have some concerns about the work the company does and whether or not it is completely ethical? If there is any question about this at all it is much more important to maintain your own personal ethics and not take the job. While the compensation and benefits could be enticing, if you don’t agree with the beliefs of the company then it’s hard to be completely dedicated.
  • When the money isn’t right. There is a reason this is last on the list. Money really shouldn’t be the deal breaker for most situations. If everything else lines up, you will enjoy the work, you feel good about the company, and you see a future in this career you can probably make the money work. However, if the offered salary is in no way aligned with your expectations and the standards in your area you should let them know and decline the offer (or make a counteroffer).

Are you ready to accept the right job offer? Meador Staffing is currently hiring for jobs in Houston TX so call today!

Are Your Job Requirements Scaring Candidates Away?

March 20th, 2015

Hiring is a delicate dance that involves a lot of moving parts. You need to start with a clear and concise job description. From there, you will match resumes to the job and begin contacting candidates. But what if your job listing doesn’t get the response you were hoping for or expecting? Could your job requirements be scaring away the best candidates for the role? Let’s take a look at the way your company’s requirements might be giving professionals the wrong impression and keeping them away from your doors.

  • Requirements are too specific. After the recession, many companies changed their hiring strategies. Instead of hiring for potential, they began to list every possible skill a candidate must possess in order to qualify for the job. Occasionally, these lists became so cumbersome there was no possibility that any candidate could have all of that experience. This is what effectively created what is known as the skills gap. If your job posting reads like a grocery list and suggests that the unqualified need not apply, you may not be getting any candidates – much less quality ones.
  • Requirements are not specific enough. On the flip side, some job descriptions have the opposite problem. They don’t provide enough information to let the candidates know what the job is or what experience is expected. When this happens, hiring managers see an influx of resumes in their inbox but none of them are qualified. Job seekers aren’t mind readers. You need to strike a balance in your description of what you require versus the employee’s potential to learn.
  • Stay away from industry jargon. Does your job posting look more like alphabet soup than a concise paragraph that would entice someone to work for your company? While some people believe that putting the industry terms in the description is necessary to weed out the candidates without the right experience, it can also be off-putting. The challenge is that even industry jargon varies from company to company, so what you call something may not be what everyone is familiar with or calls it. Write job postings in friendly, personal language.
  • Provide reasons why a candidate would apply. Lastly, you need to make sure there is some incentive to apply. The reward isn’t just the job itself, but the opportunity for the right person to work for your company and be successful. These reasons just can’t be implied. Talk a little about your company values and culture to attract candidates who share similar values to enhance your company. Let candidates know that you want people who are a match for your company and can contribute in the long term.

Are you looking for great candidates to add to your team? Meador Staffing Agencies in Austin TX can help today!