5 Questions You Should Ask a Project Manager

November 17th, 2016

Hiring for a new project manager involves more than just typical interview questions. This individual will be responsible for the delegation of a large number of tasks, so their skills may be very different from that of any other role in your organization. Before you make a hiring decision, are you certain you’re asking the right questions to determine if the candidate is qualified? Here are 5 questions you should be asking to determine if they’re the right fit for your company.

What don’t you want to work on?

Project managers have a very specific set of processes to get the job done. By asking what it is they won’t do, you can learn even more about what kind of skills they bring to the table and whether or not they are a fit for your specific environment. What will be a deal breaker for your company when it comes to things this project manager won’t contribute to in the office or for clients?

What makes for a great project manager?

You want to dig into their brains a little deeper. What do they think are the skills that make a project manager successful? Do they possess these skills or are they simply reciting things they think you want to hear? Do they seem like they will bring more value to the table than the other candidates you’ve spoken with?

How have you become a better project manager?

Successful people learn from their mistakes. No one should come into an interview insisting they are without fault. You want to find out what they’ve done in the past and how they’ve stumbled and improved their experience for the long term. Someone who isn’t humble or can’t come up with ways they’ve become better may not be the right fit for your company.

How do you communicate with team members or clients?

One of the most important skills for a project manager is communication. Not only do they need to communicate with their own employees, but they also need to talk with clients and people in all positions at your own organization. How do they interact with people who have different levels of importance or power?

How easy is it for you delegate?

Lastly, a project manager who can’t delegate isn’t a project manager at all. Micromanagement does not help the team or the project succeed. It only demonstrates that the project manager can’t relinquish control of the tasks at hand and feel they can always do a better job. This is counter to the purpose of a project manager and will not lead to success for the project itself.

Are you looking for a project manager to add to your team? Meador Staffing is ready to find the right job candidate for your team. Contact a leader among Texas staffing agencies today!

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