Answering “What is your Greatest Weakness?”

January 18th, 2013

Is it a trick question or do they want you to answer honestly? How exactly do you know how to answer when an interviewer asks about your greatest weakness? Do you need to tell them how bad you are at something or can you spin a positive attribute into a negative one? Here are some tips for navigating the muddy waters of the weakness questions.

  1. Prepare, prepare, prepare. Interviewers can tell if you’re making something up on the spot. It can result in a less than positive interaction. Think about this question long and hard before you ever make it to the interview; you will likely be asked some form of it. Think of a way to answer this question that is thoughtful and provides some real insight into you as a person and a candidate for their position.
  2. Avoid the key requirements. Whatever you do, don’t answer this question with something that specifically contradicts the core requirements of the job itself. Prepare for the interview by understanding the company and the job description. If you know the position involves entering information into a customer website and incorrect data can result in significant revenue loss; don’t tell the interviewer that you have trouble paying attention to details.
  3. Challenge, action, result. Professional career coaches recommend using this approach to answer this question. Determine what the most challenging part of your example is, the action you took to correct it, and the positive outcome of the overall situation. Most interviewers don’t like the “turning a positive into a negative” answer to this question because it inevitably sounds fake, but this answer format still provides valuable information about your weakness but ends with a positive result. It gets you to the same place.
  4. Don’t recite cliché answers. Recruiters hear things all the time like “I’m a perfectionist.” This answer doesn’t provide any concrete information it is just regurgitating things that we know are negative. If you really feel as though your perfectionism is your biggest weaknesses consider rewording your answer. You could tell them that you have trouble giving up control of projects because you want to make sure every detail is perfect. Remember to provide an action and a positive result. Tell them that you seek out other members of the team with strong skills and learn to rely on their expertise.

Are you looking for ways to creatively answer the most common interview questions? Meador Staffing can provide helpful advice for your job search.

Everything You Need to Know About Presenting Yourself at the Interview

December 28th, 2012

You’ve already made a great first impression. By the time a company calls you for an interview they have already reviewed your qualifications and they feel you might be a fit for their organization. The face to face meeting is to demonstrate your interpersonal skills and determine if you are right for their team. Here is the place where you need to shine. Consider these 5 tips to be the best candidate you can be at the interview.

  1. Research. Before you ever set foot through the door be sure to research everything you can about the company, their industry, and even some of the key players in the organization. All of this information is readily available on the internet and will help you sound prepared and knowledgeable.
  2. Show them how you meet their needs. Now that you know what they do, apply that information to your skills and experience. You want to provide specific examples that relate to their industry. Refer to the job description and explain how your skills can help them take this position, and their company, to the next level.
  3. Practice. Before the interview, take some time to practice your pitch. Have your friends or family members help you. Also, speak in front of mirror so you can get a feeling for your own body language and curb anything that may be inappropriate for the final interview. The more comfortable you are speaking in front of the interviewer the more confident you will sound.
  4. Common interview questions. You’re certainly aware of the common interview questions such as “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?” or simply, “Tell me about yourself.” You need to be prepared with answers to these questions. You want to answer simply and truthfully but you also want to sound creative and inventive.
  5. Ask your own questions. Interviews shouldn’t be an interrogation; they should be a conversation. You should prepare some questions of your own, based on your research of the company, to ask the interviewer.

Are you looking for advice to help you prepare for your next interview? Contact Meador Staffing to find out how we can help you.

Save Money! While Keeping Your Employees Safe

December 7th, 2012

It is a common misconception that working in an office is one of the safest environments when it comes to workplace injuries. We ask ourselves “how dangerous could it possibly be?”  In 2011, Liberty Mutual released the statistic that almost all workplace injuries happen in the office. While manufacturing companies have systems in place to deal with injuries or to prevent them in the first place, many office based businesses don’t think about it much. Ultimately, having plans to handle situations that may cause injury will save your company money when it comes to workers compensation claims. Here are some of the things to consider when putting together a safety plan.

  1. Heavy or improper lifting. We all do it. We know that we are supposed to bend at the knees and use that leverage to lift a heavy box off the floor but we don’t always pay attention. However, if an employee does this on your property they can make an injury claim. Encourage your office employees to wear a belt if they will be lifting heavy things or to ask for help from another team member.
  2. Preventable falls. Some falls are going to happen, but there are some tumbles that are 100% preventable. If there is debris, water, or other hazards on the floor, most commonly in the break room, deal with it immediately upon discovery. Encourage your employees to clean up after themselves if they spill something creating a hazard for others. The parking lot is also another zone of potential injury. Watch for cracks or loose gravel and establish a way to mark these areas and fix the problem.
  3. The staircases. Falling in the break room or hallway is a different sort of injury than falling down the stairs. Often these types of injuries occur when an employee is carrying something up or down with them. This can obscure their vision or cause them to be unable to hold onto the railing for support. Prevent this kind of behavior by having processes in place to move large items between floors in your office.
  4. Repetitive motion. Another common office workplace injury is caused by repetitive motion. This can cause syndromes such as carpel tunnel. Allow your employees to take breaks from repetitive tasks or create environments where these projects are split up among several employees.

Are you looking for more management best practices to implement in your business environment? Contact Meador Staffing today to see how we can assist you!